1. We visited the BRIC studios in downtown Brooklyn today to record a segment for their BK Live show. Topics ranged from renegade marijuana plants in Brooklyn to vintage bagel videos to Edgar Allen Poe’s alleged frolic on Coney Island, and everything in between! 

     
     
  2. Curious about our hot-off-the-presses digital newspaper resource, Brooklyn Newsstand?  Did you know it offers the full run of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle newspaper from 1841 - 1955?  Learn more about this site and how to use it at one of our upcoming workshops, in the Info Commons Lab on the first floor of the Central Library.  No advance registration required.

     
  3. Last installment of this series on historic and contemporary trends in cocktail culture in the BPL Info Commons tomorrow (Tuesday) night!

    bplinfocommons:

    Served Up - What’s Old Is New Again: A Look at Contemporary Classic Cocktails

    Our third and final class in the Served Up series takes a look at some of the new classics developed in New York in the last decade. We will also discuss how many talented bartenders create popular new cocktails through variations on the old standards.

    Join bartender Benjamin Zorn on Tuesday, Apr 15 from 7:00pm-8:30pm in the Info Commons Lab for the last installment in this great series on cocktail culture.



     
  4. Should women quit smoking to benefit the troops? In 1945, these Brooklynites seemed to be divided on the issue. Learn more about concerns on the homefront during WWII in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle!

     
  5. Our Beer of the Week feature spotlights a different lost lager from Brooklyn’s brewing past every Wednesday. This week we look at Trommer’s Brewery, home of the once-famous White Label beer which, according to Will Anderson’s Breweries of Brooklyn “enjoyed a marvelous reputation as one of the last of the all malt and hops beers.”

    For a more intimate look at the now-lost breweries of Brooklyn, grease up your bike chain and register for Brooklyn Public Library’s Bike the Branches event, coming this May 17th! The “Bottoms Up, Brooklyn” tour — curated by Brooklyn Collection staff — will take you past some of the borough’s most notorious breweries and distilleries, as well as some of the latest and greatest in cocktail culture. Register now: http://misc.brooklynpubliclibrary.org/btb/

     
  6. UNESCO declared 1979 the year of the child, and Brooklyn Public Library celebrated in a big way, with programs for children throughout the year and an indoor street fair at Pratt Institute’s fieldhouse on March 31st. This video, created by BPL’s in-house media production department, captures one particularly hypnotic portion of the day’s festivities — a group of children dancing to Kraftwerk.

     
     
  7. For today’s installment of Throwback Thursday, here’s a photo of fresh-faced City Councilman Anthony Weiner (right) with then-library directory Larry Brandwein at what is likely the ribbon-cutting ceremony for the reopening of the Brooklyn Heights Branch in 1993. The youngest person to ever win a City Council seat, Weiner began representing Brooklyn in 1991 before moving on to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1998.

     
  8. Brooklyn was once a center of American brewing, thanks to an influx of German immigrants in the 1800s who would operate 45 breweries in the borough by the end of the century. Prohibition halted the flow of malted delights, forcing the closure of nearly all of the brewing plants. Even those that returned to glory after the repeal of the Volstead Act were shuttered or relocated by the end of the 1970s, leaving Brooklyn without a beer to call its own until the recent resurgence of craft brewing. Our Beer of the Week feature will take a look at a different lost brewery each week. We open with the Piel Brother’s brewery of East New York.

    For a more intimate look at the now-lost breweries of Brooklyn, grease up your bike chain and register for Brooklyn Public Library’s Bike the Branches event, coming this May 17th! The “Bottoms Up, Brooklyn” tour — curated by Brooklyn Collection staff — will take you past some of the borough’s most notorious breweries and distilleries, as well as some of the latest and greatest in cocktail culture. Register now: http://misc.brooklynpubliclibrary.org/btb/

     
  9. On this day, March 27, 1905, the first criminal case was solved using the new fingerprinting technique. The method was developed by the forensic science pioneer Alphonse Bertillon who also developed what is now known as a mug shot and many other crime-solving innovations. His image can be easily found online, here is the verbal description from the Brooklyn Daily Eagle which appeared in the paper the fall of 1905. This invention spawned a score of short-lived fashion fads, such as finger photo printing and novelty fingerprint albums. The army saw the opportunity and started finger-printing troops - in order to be able to trace deserters. The first case of the new method of fighting crime was reported in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle in the fall of 1906 and it deals with shop-lifting of fur muffs!

     
  10. A few finds from the historic “Brooklyn Citizen” newspaper. The paper seemed to have a mild obsession with hair.
    The Veronica Lake piece is from the height of WWII, the story appeared on the front page above the fold, on Feb. 16, 1943. The London music hall story is from 1928.